Ghost Hunt Manga: Inada Shiho x Ono Fuyumi Dialogue

Inada Shiho completed the Ghost Hunt manga prior to the reprint of Ono Fuyumi’s novel series. Magazine Da Vinci conducted this interview with both creators in commemoration of the last volume’s publication. This marks the last translation of Da Vinci’s 2010 special Ghost Hunt reprint feature. At the end of this post I added links to some additional scans and readers’ columns.

Inada Shiho and Ono Fuyumi
Inada Shiho and Ono Fuyumi

Inada Shiho x Ono Fuyumi

Congratulations! Celebrating the completion of the Ghost Hunt comic’s 12th volume.

The Ghost Hunt manga, which was started 6 years after the conclusion of the original work by Inada Shiho-san, finally published its last volume 12 years after the beginning of its serialization. As a substitute to the difficult-to-obtain original work, the comic edition became burdened as the figurehead of the series. In commemoration of its completion, a dialogue takes place between Ono Fuyumi-san and Inada Shiho-san who share a deep friendship in the workplace as well as in private. This pair are having a dialogue in a magazine for the very first time; what kind of behind-the-scenes stories will they reveal!?

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Ono Fuyumi Long Interview Part 3: Rewriting Ghost Hunt

This is the last part of the interview with Ono Fuyumi from Da Vinci‘s December 2010 issue, in which Ono talks about rewriting the original Ghost Hunt series. Please go to part one “The Ghost Hunt Series Reprint” to read the interview from the beginning.

Ono Fuyumi on rewriting Ghost Hunt.

Now it’s 2010. Approximately 18 years have passed since the completion of the series, and Shibuya Psychic Research returns in front of us. Though the fully rewritten edition keeps the atmosphere of the old series, it will also be able to put up with the aesthetic senses of adult readers. It will be finished into a long horror novel of extremely high quality.

Of course, I altered the writing style, but the vignettes and the composition were changed quite a bit as well. Due to the circumstances with the pages back in the day, I was only able to change the story once. In principle, the story should have been made to change once or twice. This time, I was finally able to write it how it should have been.

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Ono Fuyumi Long Interview Part 2: The Rules for Writing Girls’ Novels

This is the second part of the interview with Ono Fuyumi from Da Vinci‘s December 2010 issue. Ono discusses the rules and restrictions she encountered at the time of writing the original Ghost Hunt series. Please go to part one “The Ghost Hunt Series Reprint” to read the interview from the beginning.

Ono Fuyumi
Left: The galley proofs of the Ghost Hunt series and her favorite Japanese language dictionary. Right: The state of her work desk. It is decorated with a colored paper signed by mangaka Nagai Gou.

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Ono Fuyumi Long Interview Part 1: The Ghost Hunt Series Reprint

This interview with Ono Fuyumi is part of the Ghost Hunt Reprint Commemoration Special Feature. It was printed in the December 2010 issue of the Da Vinci magazine. The interview also includes some photographs of the author herself and her house. I divided the translation up into three parts. In the first part Ono talks about the reasons for the Ghost Hunt series reprint, and the origin of original series.

Ono Fuyumi Long Interview

Ono Fuyumi, author of Ghost Hunt

Timeless edition! The Ghost Hunt series Reprint Commemoration

The reprint of the Ghost Hunt series, long-awaited for by many fans, is about to turn into reality at last. Why did author Ono Fuyumi-san make up her mind about the reprint of the series just now? What are the differences between the old edition and the rewrite? This is a long interview in which we courageously asked about her memories at the time of the series’ creation, and her feelings on putting out the reprint. A large number of valuable remarks are revealed for the first time: a timeless edition!

I was confident that scary things are fun.

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The Waterworld of Michael Dudok de Wit

In this interview Director Michael Dudok de Wit talks about the use of the waterworld, water and aquatic creatures in his film The Red Turtle and his other works. De Correspondent originally conducted this interview and published it on their website on July 21, 2016. If you can read Dutch, please click here to read the interview in its original language.

Michael Dudok de Wit labored ten years on his new, widely praised animation film about a man who washes up on an inhabited island. Water and aquatic animals are recurring themes in his works. Where does his fascination come from?

The Waterworld of Michael Dudok de Wit

Interview: The Endlessly Fascinating Waterworld of the Man Behind the Red Turtle

His short animation The Monk and the Fish was nominated for an Oscar. His short animation Father and Daughter won an Oscar. But Father and Daughter also won – actually a much greater honor – the admiration of the legendary Japanese animation company Studio Ghibli. ‘Can’t you make a long film for us,’ they mailed in 20061)Studio Ghibli did not work previously with a non-Japanese animator, but still pulled out – together with French film distributor Wild Bunch ...continue. The Red Turtle was born.

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Notes   [ + ]

1. Studio Ghibli did not work previously with a non-Japanese animator, but still pulled out – together with French film distributor Wild Bunch – millions of euros to let Dudok de Wit – together with dozens of animators – work in complete freedom on his dreamed of first long animation.